Hoppy Easter with N1

Have you ever wondered why it’s a rabbit that symbolises Easter, and not a frog or a giraffe?  And what’s with the eggs, why not oranges or chestnuts or even pickled cabbage for that matter? How about the Easter Bunny’s naughty or nice list, did you know he had one – not the sole preserve of that jolly old fellow in red it would seem. If you want to know why we embrace the egg-giving-bunny and not the sauerkraut-bearing-frog, read on …

Truth be told, the ‘sauerkraut’ gives it away – yes, the celebrated rabbit has its roots firmly set in Germanic history. According to Discovery News – the online news portal for the Discovery Channel – bunnies and eggs are of pagan and not religious descent, and can be traced back as early as the 13th century when Germans (pre-Christian times) worshiped a number of gods and goddesses. The deity that our current Easter tradition first began with was Eostra, the goddess of spring and fertility – feasts were held to honour her and celebrate her season of plenty. Her symbol of choice was the rabbit because of its fast reproductive rate, and that is the reason why today we celebrate the Easter Bunny.

Documented as early as the 1500s, the first published story of the Easter Bunny was in 1680 – by then it had become the tale of a rabbit laying eggs (also a symbol of new life, rebirth and fertility) and hiding them in and around a garden. These stories became legends and in the 1700s as German immigrants moved over to the United States, the stories came along with them. As time progressed, the tradition became to make nests for the eggs, nests turned into colourful baskets, and eventually eggs turned into sweets and small gifts.

So there you go, that is why we have an egg-giving-bunny and not a sauerkraut-bearing-frog – thank goodness, chocolate is so much easier to eat than pickled cabbage don’t you think?! Happy Easter from all at N1 – South African Meat Wholesalers – travel safely, enjoy the time with family and friends and happy hunting on Sunday morning …